Qi SE Cozzia USA Model Should Hit The Market in May 2017

Cozzia USA, a supplier of robotic massage technology, announced that it is unveiling the newest Qi SE massage chair. The Qi SE was designed to imitate a full body massage experience that reaches more spots than any other modern models. Cozzia delivered superior products in the past. The Qi SE promise to provide a superior massage and cover every part of the person’s body to promote rejuvenation and circulation.

“Cozzia is extremely excited about launching the Qi SE at the upcoming April market,” says Bob Bruns, President of Cozzia USA. “This chair will change the landscape of the massag chair market in the US”. The Qi SE will be shown for the first time at the High Point Furniture Market (Furniture Plaza 515).

Here is some features as described in Cozzia USA Debuts Qi SE press release:

The Cozzia Qi SE massage chair will be the first 4D L-Track in the Cozzia lineup. With an L-Track design the Qi SE is able to massage the entire length of your back, from your neck down to under your glutes. To create the full body massage experience, the Qi SE has a customizable complete leg massage – in addition to sole rollers and foot and calf compression, the Qi SE has heated knee compression massage that is adjustable to massage the upper calf as well.

To utilize and intensify the benefits of Chromotherapy, the Qi SE has upgraded mood lighting that we call “Chromotherapy 2.0”. This LED lighting that is positioned in the headrest of the Qi SE provides color therapy through patterns of varying colors. The Qi SE also features rollers that are equipped with heat so that the user can have precise heat therapy in the spot they need it most. Other features of the Qi SE include: a touch pad remote control, bluetooth speakers for playing music, 60 airbags for full body air compression, the ability to create and save a custom program, and the zero gravity position.

As written by https://www.massage-chair-review.com:

The Qi SE features rich styling with beautiful stitching and a very comfortable feel to the plush seat. To operate the chair you have the Cozzia touchpad with all of the functions easily accessible right on the screen for easy navigation through the various programs and adjustments. The chair will give you the option to create and save your various preferences to get you to relaxation in seconds. Most chairs will require you to manually adjust the chair, making the quick one touch access a great function to have.

Watch this video from CNET to get a feel on features, look and pricing of a new QI SE model:

Furniture Today describes additional features:

In addition to the 4D L-Track technology, Cozzia’s newest chair can deliver a full body massage using 60 airbags, customizable leg massage that includes foot and calf compression, heated knee compression massage that’s adjustable to the upper calf and sole rollers.

Heated rollers offer spot-specific heat therapy.

This newest chair offers Chromatherapy 2.0, an upgraded LED light positioned in the headrest to provide color therapy through patterns of varying colors. Other features include a zero-gravity position, touch pad remote control, Bluetooth-enabled speakers, and the ability to create and save custom program.

The Qi SE retails for $6,999 and will be available at select retailers in four color variations. It has the design aesthetics and profile of the Qi, which launched last year, and is a scaled down version without the Qi’s signature Chair Doctor technology of 4D body scanning and tension score feedback.

Here is the official video from Cozzia:

To find out more about top rated chairs check out this guide at: http://www.wellnessgeeky.com/best-massage-chair

Read Full Article Here: Qi SE Cozzia USA Model Should Hit The Market in May 2017

Your Dreams Are Probably Stupid And Nobody Cares (That’s a Good Thing)

Your Dreams Are Probably Stupid And Nobody Cares (That’s a Good Thing)

When I was a little kid, I had an idea about what the afterlife would involve.

I thought that after I died, I’d go to some place where a bunch of people, sort of like the chorus in a Greek tragedy, would show me film reels of my most embarrassing and uncool moments — picking my nose on the toilet, the time I farted in my boss’ face, that sort of thing.

It would be an epic circus of my humiliation, painstakingly documented by — who? minor deities? accountants of Hell? all the boys I ever had an awkward crush on? My immature theology was never quite clear on that.

The concept here is that some group of people is watching my every move, cataloguing it for posterity, and really really caring about it.

That sounds dumb, of course.

But isn’t that how we act when it comes to our own self-image?

I mean, isn’t that just basically Twitter, Instagram, and sharing all your workouts to Facebook?

Many of us at some point have operated with the core beliefs that:

  • We are being closely observed.
  • We are being closely observed by people who really, really care.
  • The people who really, really care are judgmental as shit.
  • We really, really care that they really, really care.
  • So we have to act in ways that don’t let those people find any flaws. We must be perfect, lest this committee make us sit in a plastic folding chair with our eyes propped open, watching footage of that time we fucked up a Powerpoint and pooped our pants.

Many years ago, every time I worked out, I’d imagine a group of Stumptuous readers tsk-tsking.

“How can she have such a lousy squat?”

“Yes, her butt does look terrible in those pants… and in all pants ever invented.”

“What a poser.”

To be clear, I was working out alone.

By myself.

Invisible to the internet (yes, youngsters, there was a time when that was possible).

Nobody cared about my dreams.

Nobody cared whether I was a bodybuilder or a powerlifter, good at bench pressing, whether I was doing 3 sets of 5 or 5 sets of 3, what % of my 1RM I was using, or what I had for lunch.

For that matter, nobody cared about my cellulite angst, my squat numbers (or any other numbers), my weight, my butt’s shape / size / dimensions / aesthetic correctness, or any other trivial detail of my life.

Unless maybe I stepped on their foot on the subway or played my music too loud or cut them off in traffic, then other people briefly cared about how my trajectory might be interfering with theirs. Until they didn’t care again.

And yet I acted like they cared.

I acted and thought like everyone cared. Deeply.

I acted and thought like the rest of the world was arguing about my relative merits in the same way that old men around the world argue about football on smoky Sunday afternoons in the local café — passionately, with excruciating attention to errors, narratively needlepointing every fine detail of every stat and movement, gesticulating to indicate displeasure with fingers stabbing into the air.

I acted and thought like everyone gave a huge wet-burrito shit about all of it. All of me. All of my life.

My dreams. My worries. My thoughts.

Like my life was some Truman Show with cameras everywhere, even inside my brain.

But it’s not.

Now to be clear, I don’t mean I am alone and unloved.

I’m not hurtling isolated on this bald blue planet through space, silently weeping because there is no God and I can’t address my thank-you letters for a sunny day to any particular cosmic customer service representative.

Well, there is no God, and saying “thank you physics for the photons” doesn’t quite have the same thrill, but the fact that 7 billion people in the world aren’t breathlessly hitting “refresh” to find out what amazing thing I am doing doesn’t mean I live in some nihilist cave.

I’m surrounded by caring friends and family, by people who are interested in what I have to say, and do, and who I am, and my opinions on Manchego cheese (delicious), the Middle East (I can’t even) or Saul Bellow (literary genius).

It’s just that what they love, care about, and are interested in has nothing to do with all the stuff I thought was important.

Stuff like:

  • How much weight I could lift (or not).
  • How fast I could run (or waddle).
  • How high I could jump (ha).
  • My clothing size.
  • My weight.
  • My (in)visible abs.
  • Whether I was doing X style workout or Y style.
  • Whether I was eating X diet or Y diet or not at all.
  • Whether I had been “bad” or “good”.
  • Whether I had accomplished my desired number of reps and sets.
  • Whether I had trained my core, or my posterior chain, or my stability, and exactly which method I used.

In fact, talking and worrying about all of the above, or related topics, makes you boring as shit. (Even to people who love you dearly and think the way you say “refrigerator” is delightful.)

In North America, we have a particular conceit. Which is:

We think our dreams are intrinsically valuable because they are our dreams.

If other people critique our dreams, or don’t care about our dreams, or don’t give us the right reaction when we grandly announce that we are following our dreams, we think they are hatin-ass morons who don’t care about our dreams.

Which they should! Because those are our dreams! All dreams are good and amazing and beautiful and worthy of slackjawed wondrous awe!

Stop and think about that for a moment.

Demanding unwavering allegiance to the correctness of dreams is what toddlers do.

Children are fundamentally egocentric. They have no context or comparison. Their small world is everything.

They will build an elaborate fort, announce that it is a spaceship, and scream you straight to hell if you tell them that it’s just a bunch of stupid pillows. You’d better buy in to that pillow ship, my friend.

Now, of course, in children, this is delightful.

I love watching kids create imaginary universes and live them. They encourage all of us cynically defeated adult bastards to believe in magic, if only for a few moments.

I also think imagination is a grand thing in general. I have a solid roster of mental adventure stories, starring myself as a pirate ninja sharpshooter acrobat popstar brain surgeon… or whatever.

But I don’t mix up imagination with reality.

Here’s what mixing up a child’s imagination with adult reality looks like.

  • You worry about being “good”. Or “bad”.
  • If you are “good”, it’s mostly for show. And doesn’t last. (Ta daaaa! Aren’t I behaving so much better than my little sister right now?)
  • If you are “bad”, you make confessions on the internet. (OMG! Here’s what I ate! Soooo naughty! Teehee!)
  • You think that magic is real — that there is a fairy-dusted mixture of sets and reps and macronutrients that unlocks the special door to Buffland.
  • You demand that all of us look at you! Look at you! Oh my goodness! You lifted like a big girl! So strong!
  • Oh dear! You did not lift as much weight as you wanted! So sad! You should punish yourself! You should have a tantrum!
  • You confuse a given outcome with intrinsic value — an “A” on your spelling test, a gold star for being a good girl, a pat on the head for nice cursive writing, a high-five for your bathroom selfie.

If this isn’t you, and right now you’re chain-smoking Marlboros, leafing through your mutual fund reports, and chuckling in a growly Joan Crawford voice about how you just can’t be arsed to care about anything — congratulations. Enjoy your eccentric, very grown-up performance artist / sociopathic life.

The truth is:

We all have a little bit of small child in our brains.

Most of us want there to be magic.

Most of us want other people to love us and give us gold stars.

Most of us want to perform well.

Most of us want to play by the social rules and win the game.

Most of us don’t want to be ostracized, “get in trouble”, or be the group weirdo.

Most of us probably just need some juice, a cuddle, and a nap.

That’s normal.

We shouldn’t kill off our imaginations.

Again, pirate ninja sharpshooter acrobat popstar brain surgeon. 900 degree Tony Hawk spin!

Rad, right?

We should, however, learn to distinguish child-brain from adult-brain.

And this includes getting clear about what we’re doing, why we’re doing it, and where reality will impose natural and necessary limitations on us.

Think about it this way.

Imagine a 4-square grid.

One dimension is “ego-gratifying”. This runs from “completely self-centered” to “selfless”.

The second dimension is “realistic”. This runs from “could do it right now, now problem” to “you have to break the laws of space and time to make this happen”.

So you can have basically 4 types of things (with lots of stuff in between along a continuum, of course).

  1. Ego-gratifying and unrealistic. Basically you winning the world and having everyone notice. Awesome to imagine; don’t try executing any of these things seriously unless you want to become an obsessive, frustrated a-hole and have crying jags because you can’t free-dive a kilometre or walk around at 5% bodyfat all the time.
  2. Ego-gratifying and realistic. Everyone needs a little bit of this one in their lives. But not too much. Maybe 10-20% of your activities and effort should live here.
  3. Non-ego-gratifying and unrealistic. “World peace” and “Save all the whales” usually lives in here, unless “Save the whales” is really about you building some environmentalist empire, which is not that crazy if you see How To Change The World and realize that social movements involve a lot more dick-waving than you’d expect. Any genital waving bumps it back up to Category 1. Actually Category 3 is sneakily a lot like Category 1. If you’re a coach / trainer “just trying to help” by berating or pushing your clients in a noble martyred struggle against ignorance and sloth, you may think you’re #3 when you’re really #1.
  4. Non-ego-gratifying and realistic. This is where most of your life should be if you want to be happy, sane, and functional. Of course, we’re not looking for complete self-erasure here in Category 4, or some weird trippy Zen state where you serenely declare that all is all.

So what lives in Category 4 — non-ego-gratifying and realistic?

Empathy and compassion — helping other people in ways that they genuinely need and want, as well as having compassion for yourself.

Intrinsic mastery — learning skills that you truly enjoy and find useful, slowly and consistently.

Beginner’s mind — being open to new ideas, learning, expanding your worldview, and being coached.

Seeking, getting, and taking feedback — using data, information, and the evidence of experience to make decisions.

Scientific reasoning — looking at evidence, thinking critically, avoiding magical leaps of logic.

Showing up for practice — just showing up. Plain old showing up. Being there. Putting in the reps. Doing what needs to be done. Not looking for shortcuts; realizing that the practice is the point.

Enjoying things for their own sake — having fun, playing, simply being present.

OK, look, I don’t mean to be a downer.

Living in the non-ego-gratifying real world is awesome.

You’re truly free.

If you know your dreams are silly and that nobody cares about them, YOU get to decide whether you try to manifest them.

YOU get to decide whether they’re worth giving a shit about.

YOU get to decide whether they should live in your head (yay) or live outside (yay), and you know the difference between what’s inside and outside.

If you know your dreams are silly, but you really want to do something, you can choose to replace them with less-silly ones. Get coaching and feedback from people who have the objective expertise to help you, and don’t pout when they guide you gently towards reality.

If you know your dreams are silly and you do them anyway, recognizing that they are utterly ridiculous and probably won’t amount to shit, we call that fun. We call that a hobby. Or an eccentricity. Silly pointless goofing around is how disc golf, extreme ironing, and Roomba Pong got invented. None of it was needed, but it sure does spice up life.

Pointless antics often form the fountain of creativity, as long as you don’t take them too seriously. (Check out the Stupid Shit No-One Needs and Terrible Ideas Hackathon.)

If you know that nobody cares, we also call that fun. Because play can’t be too concerned with the audience.

Most of the time, nobody is judging you because they’re too caught up in their own paranoia about their own embarrassing afterlife blooper reel.

You’re completely liberated from the weight of other people’s imaginary shit-giving.

Even if they are judging you, it’s cursory. It’s a brief blip before they return to their own rumination. So, no harm no foul.

What would you do if there was no “measuring up”?

If there was no social scrutiny?

No Truman Show cameras?

What would you do if, figuratively, you were alone in all the very best ways — the delicious kind of aloneness where you can wear your jammies with the peanut butter stains, and sing I Will Survive in your loudest voice, and pee with the door open, and be like Tom Cruise in Risky Business? That kind of dance-like-nobody’s-watching feeling?

Take that feeling, and bring it along with you wherever you go.

You don’t have to be alone and drunk-dancing in your underwear to feel it. You can choose to feel it anywhere, any time.

You can nurture that feeling of fundamental freedom and fun in any environment, with any pursuit.

There’s no final exam. There are no judges. There are few rules besides reality requiring that you face it.

And if you fuck it up, well… if there’s no God, there’s probably also no film crew.

 

Me and some peeps from my boxing class, so concerned with serious appearances and impressing people.

Original Article:  Your Dreams Are Probably Stupid And Nobody Cares

Your Dreams Are Probably Stupid And Nobody Cares (That’s a Good Thing)

When I was a little kid, I had an idea about what the afterlife would involve.

I thought that after I died, I’d go to some place where a bunch of people, sort of like the chorus in a Greek tragedy, would show me film reels of my most embarrassing and uncool moments — picking my nose on the toilet, the time I farted in my boss’ face, that sort of thing.

It would be an epic circus of my humiliation, painstakingly documented by — who? minor deities? accountants of Hell? all the boys I ever had an awkward crush on? My immature theology was never quite clear on that.

The concept here is that some group of people is watching my every move, cataloguing it for posterity, and really really caring about it.

That sounds dumb, of course.

But isn’t that how we act when it comes to our own self-image?

I mean, isn’t that just basically Twitter, Instagram, and sharing all your workouts to Facebook?

Many of us at some point have operated with the core beliefs that:

  • We are being closely observed.
  • We are being closely observed by people who really, really care.
  • The people who really, really care are judgmental as shit.
  • We really, really care that they really, really care.
  • So we have to act in ways that don’t let those people find any flaws. We must be perfect, lest this committee make us sit in a plastic folding chair with our eyes propped open, watching footage of that time we fucked up a Powerpoint and pooped our pants.

Many years ago, every time I worked out, I’d imagine a group of Stumptuous readers tsk-tsking.

“How can she have such a lousy squat?”

“Yes, her butt does look terrible in those pants… and in all pants ever invented.”

“What a poser.”

To be clear, I was working out alone.

By myself.

Invisible to the internet (yes, youngsters, there was a time when that was possible).

Nobody cared about my dreams.

Nobody cared whether I was a bodybuilder or a powerlifter, good at bench pressing, whether I was doing 3 sets of 5 or 5 sets of 3, what % of my 1RM I was using, or what I had for lunch.

For that matter, nobody cared about my cellulite angst, my squat numbers (or any other numbers), my weight, my butt’s shape / size / dimensions / aesthetic correctness, or any other trivial detail of my life.

Unless maybe I stepped on their foot on the subway or played my music too loud or cut them off in traffic, then other people briefly cared about how my trajectory might be interfering with theirs. Until they didn’t care again.

And yet I acted like they cared.

I acted and thought like everyone cared. Deeply.

I acted and thought like the rest of the world was arguing about my relative merits in the same way that old men around the world argue about football on smoky Sunday afternoons in the local café — passionately, with excruciating attention to errors, narratively needlepointing every fine detail of every stat and movement, gesticulating to indicate displeasure with fingers stabbing into the air.

I acted and thought like everyone gave a huge wet-burrito shit about all of it. All of me. All of my life.

My dreams. My worries. My thoughts.

Like my life was some Truman Show with cameras everywhere, even inside my brain.

But it’s not.

Now to be clear, I don’t mean I am alone and unloved.

I’m not hurtling isolated on this bald blue planet through space, silently weeping because there is no God and I can’t address my thank-you letters for a sunny day to any particular cosmic customer service representative.

Well, there is no God, and saying “thank you physics for the photons” doesn’t quite have the same thrill, but the fact that 7 billion people in the world aren’t breathlessly hitting “refresh” to find out what amazing thing I am doing doesn’t mean I live in some nihilist cave.

I’m surrounded by caring friends and family, by people who are interested in what I have to say, and do, and who I am, and my opinions on Manchego cheese (delicious), the Middle East (I can’t even) or Saul Bellow (literary genius).

It’s just that what they love, care about, and are interested in has nothing to do with all the stuff I thought was important.

Stuff like:

  • How much weight I could lift (or not).
  • How fast I could run (or waddle).
  • How high I could jump (ha).
  • My clothing size.
  • My weight.
  • My (in)visible abs.
  • Whether I was doing X style workout or Y style.
  • Whether I was eating X diet or Y diet or not at all.
  • Whether I had been “bad” or “good”.
  • Whether I had accomplished my desired number of reps and sets.
  • Whether I had trained my core, or my posterior chain, or my stability, and exactly which method I used.

In fact, talking and worrying about all of the above, or related topics, makes you boring as shit. (Even to people who love you dearly and think the way you say “refrigerator” is delightful.)

In North America, we have a particular conceit. Which is:

We think our dreams are intrinsically valuable because they are our dreams.

If other people critique our dreams, or don’t care about our dreams, or don’t give us the right reaction when we grandly announce that we are following our dreams, we think they are hatin-ass morons who don’t care about our dreams.

Which they should! Because those are our dreams! All dreams are good and amazing and beautiful and worthy of slackjawed wondrous awe!

Stop and think about that for a moment.

Demanding unwavering allegiance to the correctness of dreams is what toddlers do.

Children are fundamentally egocentric. They have no context or comparison. Their small world is everything.

They will build an elaborate fort, announce that it is a spaceship, and scream you straight to hell if you tell them that it’s just a bunch of stupid pillows. You’d better buy in to that pillow ship, my friend.

Now, of course, in children, this is delightful.

I love watching kids create imaginary universes and live them. They encourage all of us cynically defeated adult bastards to believe in magic, if only for a few moments.

I also think imagination is a grand thing in general. I have a solid roster of mental adventure stories, starring myself as a pirate ninja sharpshooter acrobat popstar brain surgeon… or whatever.

But I don’t mix up imagination with reality.

Here’s what mixing up a child’s imagination with adult reality looks like.

  • You worry about being “good”. Or “bad”.
  • If you are “good”, it’s mostly for show. And doesn’t last. (Ta daaaa! Aren’t I behaving so much better than my little sister right now?)
  • If you are “bad”, you make confessions on the internet. (OMG! Here’s what I ate! Soooo naughty! Teehee!)
  • You think that magic is real — that there is a fairy-dusted mixture of sets and reps and macronutrients that unlocks the special door to Buffland.
  • You demand that all of us look at you! Look at you! Oh my goodness! You lifted like a big girl! So strong!
  • Oh dear! You did not lift as much weight as you wanted! So sad! You should punish yourself! You should have a tantrum!
  • You confuse a given outcome with intrinsic value — an “A” on your spelling test, a gold star for being a good girl, a pat on the head for nice cursive writing, a high-five for your bathroom selfie.

If this isn’t you, and right now you’re chain-smoking Marlboros, leafing through your mutual fund reports, and chuckling in a growly Joan Crawford voice about how you just can’t be arsed to care about anything — congratulations. Enjoy your eccentric, very grown-up performance artist / sociopathic life.

The truth is:

We all have a little bit of small child in our brains.

Most of us want there to be magic.

Most of us want other people to love us and give us gold stars.

Most of us want to perform well.

Most of us want to play by the social rules and win the game.

Most of us don’t want to be ostracized, “get in trouble”, or be the group weirdo.

Most of us probably just need some juice, a cuddle, and a nap.

That’s normal.

We shouldn’t kill off our imaginations.

Again, pirate ninja sharpshooter acrobat popstar brain surgeon. 900 degree Tony Hawk spin!

Rad, right?

We should, however, learn to distinguish child-brain from adult-brain.

And this includes getting clear about what we’re doing, why we’re doing it, and where reality will impose natural and necessary limitations on us.

Think about it this way.

Imagine a 4-square grid.

One dimension is “ego-gratifying”. This runs from “completely self-centered” to “selfless”.

The second dimension is “realistic”. This runs from “could do it right now, now problem” to “you have to break the laws of space and time to make this happen”.

So you can have basically 4 types of things (with lots of stuff in between along a continuum, of course).

  1. Ego-gratifying and unrealistic. Basically you winning the world and having everyone notice. Awesome to imagine; don’t try executing any of these things seriously unless you want to become an obsessive, frustrated a-hole and have crying jags because you can’t free-dive a kilometre or walk around at 5% bodyfat all the time.
  2. Ego-gratifying and realistic. Everyone needs a little bit of this one in their lives. But not too much. Maybe 10-20% of your activities and effort should live here.
  3. Non-ego-gratifying and unrealistic. “World peace” and “Save all the whales” usually lives in here, unless “Save the whales” is really about you building some environmentalist empire, which is not that crazy if you see How To Change The World and realize that social movements involve a lot more dick-waving than you’d expect. Any genital waving bumps it back up to Category 1. Actually Category 3 is sneakily a lot like Category 1. If you’re a coach / trainer “just trying to help” by berating or pushing your clients in a noble martyred struggle against ignorance and sloth, you may think you’re #3 when you’re really #1.
  4. Non-ego-gratifying and realistic. This is where most of your life should be if you want to be happy, sane, and functional. Of course, we’re not looking for complete self-erasure here in Category 4, or some weird trippy Zen state where you serenely declare that all is all.

So what lives in Category 4 — non-ego-gratifying and realistic?

Empathy and compassion — helping other people in ways that they genuinely need and want, as well as having compassion for yourself.

Intrinsic mastery — learning skills that you truly enjoy and find useful, slowly and consistently.

Beginner’s mind — being open to new ideas, learning, expanding your worldview, and being coached.

Seeking, getting, and taking feedback — using data, information, and the evidence of experience to make decisions.

Scientific reasoning — looking at evidence, thinking critically, avoiding magical leaps of logic.

Showing up for practice — just showing up. Plain old showing up. Being there. Putting in the reps. Doing what needs to be done. Not looking for shortcuts; realizing that the practice is the point.

Enjoying things for their own sake — having fun, playing, simply being present.

OK, look, I don’t mean to be a downer.

Living in the non-ego-gratifying real world is awesome.

You’re truly free.

If you know your dreams are silly and that nobody cares about them, YOU get to decide whether you try to manifest them.

YOU get to decide whether they’re worth giving a shit about.

YOU get to decide whether they should live in your head (yay) or live outside (yay), and you know the difference between what’s inside and outside.

If you know your dreams are silly, but you really want to do something, you can choose to replace them with less-silly ones. Get coaching and feedback from people who have the objective expertise to help you, and don’t pout when they guide you gently towards reality.

If you know your dreams are silly and you do them anyway, recognizing that they are utterly ridiculous and probably won’t amount to shit, we call that fun. We call that a hobby. Or an eccentricity. Silly pointless goofing around is how disc golf, extreme ironing, and Roomba Pong got invented. None of it was needed, but it sure does spice up life.

Pointless antics often form the fountain of creativity, as long as you don’t take them too seriously. (Check out the Stupid Shit No-One Needs and Terrible Ideas Hackathon.)

If you know that nobody cares, we also call that fun. Because play can’t be too concerned with the audience.

Most of the time, nobody is judging you because they’re too caught up in their own paranoia about their own embarrassing afterlife blooper reel.

You’re completely liberated from the weight of other people’s imaginary shit-giving.

Even if they are judging you, it’s cursory. It’s a brief blip before they return to their own rumination. So, no harm no foul.

What would you do if there was no “measuring up”?

If there was no social scrutiny?

No Truman Show cameras?

What would you do if, figuratively, you were alone in all the very best ways — the delicious kind of aloneness where you can wear your jammies with the peanut butter stains, and sing I Will Survive in your loudest voice, and pee with the door open, and be like Tom Cruise in Risky Business? That kind of dance-like-nobody’s-watching feeling?

Take that feeling, and bring it along with you wherever you go.

You don’t have to be alone and drunk-dancing in your underwear to feel it. You can choose to feel it anywhere, any time.

You can nurture that feeling of fundamental freedom and fun in any environment, with any pursuit.

There’s no final exam. There are no judges. There are few rules besides reality requiring that you face it.

And if you fuck it up, well… if there’s no God, there’s probably also no film crew.

 

Me and some peeps from my boxing class, so concerned with serious appearances and impressing people.

Original Article:  Your Dreams Are Probably Stupid And Nobody Cares

Sauna Health Benefits and Dangers You Better Know About

Finnish sauna and similar amenities are used in all corners of the world for at least 2000 years. And it’s not accidental, as sauna has many health benefits. You’ve, probably, heard about some of them like relaxation and improved circulation, but you definitely couldn’t think of some other amazing effects of regular sauna bathing like antidepressant, analgesic and even weight loss.

Health benefits of sauna

Improved blood circulation and related benefits

Despite that improved blood circulation is commonly known effect of sauna, not many aware of additional benefits connected to it.

The most simply improved circulation means that all necessary nutrients and oxygen will get to the every cell faster (even in such “rural” areas as your extremities aka feet and hands) and all Carbon dioxide, metabolites and toxins will be removed from your body faster and more efficiently too.

Better blood supply to fat tissue also helps to reduce cellulitis.

Nerdy note: The effect of improved circulation is achieved by vasodilation (widening of your blood vessels) and increased heart rate.

Dilation of your blood vessels also helps to lower your blood pressure. It was shown that sauna bathing has positive influence on hypertension. And together with nitrate-rich plant foods and low sodium intake, could be a holistic way to treat high blood pressure condition.

 You can read more about positive effects of nitrates on hypertension here.

Mild heart exercise

Heart rate increased from heat exposure is also a mild heart exercise. That is very beneficial for everybody, but especially for people with health problems, who can’t engage in cardio exercise routinely.

There are numerous studies backing benefits of sauna on heart health, even for people with congestive heart failureOne study showed the more often you go to sauna the less is your chance to die from heart attack.

Another angle you can view increased heart rate and extra sweating in sauna, is an additional calorie burning and potential weight loss related to it.

Detoxification through skin

Skin is the largest organ of your body. You can help yourself to remove unnecessary minerals, metabolites, and excessive water, as well as harmful toxins by sweating them off in the sauna.

Removing toxins and drug residues through skin is so effective, that it’s used by drug-addiction rehabs for more than 4 decades in over 70 countries worldwide.

In medical circles this detox method is referred as Hubbard sauna regiment. It was also successfully used with 9/11 firefighters, who developed various health conditions after being exposed to harmful substances while working at the 9/11 crash site.

Traditional medicine is divided on the opinion, whether Hubbard sauna regiment and similar programs, such as Dr. George Yu sauna detox protocol, are effective. Most doctors prefer not to embrace any detox methods due to the lack of research in this area. However, modern doctors don’t like to embrace anything new that doesn’t come in form of a pill, so better try by yourself, and see a difference.

But be mindful that some trace elements as zinc, copper, iron, nickel, chromium, and molybdenum can leave your body with sweat. So make sure you eat foods or drink enough fluids rich in those elements or take supplements, if you feel like you really need it.

Improvement of skin appearance

Sweat is pushing out many impurities (like dust, makeup and bacteria) and skin fat (sebum) from your pores and reducing amount of blackheads and acne.

Skin also benefits from improved circulation while exposed to heat.

There are some skin conditions, which don’t like dry heat of sauna. You can read about them below in the “Who should avoid sauna” section.

Muscle Relaxation and Improved Joint Mobility

Heat in the sauna helps muscles to relax. It also helps to reduce exercise induced muscle soreness.

Nerdy note: Your muscles get sore from lactic acid accumulation (medial product from energy production in your muscles). Better blood circulation and heat helps to use up accumulated lactic acid faster. Lesser lactic acid you’ll have in your muscles, lesser soreness you’ll experience.

And due to the fact that heat-room exposure also increases muscle growth, sauna can be a super beneficial post-workout.

People with rheumatic disease also experience less pain and better joint mobility with regular sauna exposure.

Immune system and mood boost

Science also found that sauna has positive influence on immune system and your mood.

One of the studies found that having a Finnish sauna session twice weekly for six months reduced the incidence of the common cold by 50 percent.

Nerdy note: Its hypothesis is that sauna exposure induces DNA-synthesis and increases immunoglobulins and leukocytes in the blood, changes which might contribute to increased protection against viral infections

Another study found that people has the increase in beta-endorphins after sauna session. Endorphins are hormones, which known for their pleasure and analgesic effects.

Developing heat resistance

The most evolutionary valuable characteristic of all organisms including humans is ability to adapt. When we meet something new or unfamiliar we stress first, but then we adapt and get used to it.

The same with heat, more we exposed to heat, more easily we start to tolerate it, meaning that those hot summer days, aren’t so unbearable after all. And you can save more money on cooling or survive for longer in desert, but I hope you would not need to.

Groups of people who should avoid sauna

Despite awesomeness of sauna, there are some contradictions for its use.

  • Acute heart problems – such as unstable angina pectoris, recent myocardial infarction, severe orthostatic hypotension, and severe aortic stenosis.
  • Pregnancy in the first trimester – the first trimester is the most vulnerable time for fetus to be exposed to high heat, though risk of birth defects is much lower for kids from mothers who visited sauna regularly before pregnancy, than for those who never used sauna before conception. And short sessions, when you just start to break a sweat, are totally safe, especially if you have towel wrapped around your belly.
  • Ingestion of alcohol – people who drank alcohol before sauna has increased risk of hypotension, arrhythmia, and sudden death in the sauna.

Quoting the article from American Journal of Forensic Medicine & Pathology:“A total of 77 deaths occurred in saunas in Sweden during an 11-year period (1992-2003). Of those deaths, 71 percent were directly related to elevated blood alcohol levels rather than cardiovascular factors.”

  • Certain skin conditions – people with atopic dermatitis can experience increased itching after sauna exposure as well as exacerbation of symptoms for cholinergic urticaria, abrasions, and oozing rashes.
  • Males trying to conceive – regular sauna exposure has negative effects on sperm motility and sperm count. It’s totally reversible, meaning that after you stop using sauna, everything will go back to normal. But if you’re a male, who’s trying to conceive, refrain from sauna use.There are no effects on male hormones, though, so you won’t have any change in your libido or sexual performance. Thus, from other hand, if you don’t plan having kids, sauna will decrease you chance to get unplanned pregnancy.
  • Taking blood-thinners – sauna is often not advised by MDs for people on blood-thinners, as an additional water loss will affect your blood thickness. Though, adequate water and electrolytes intake will restore any water and minerals lost in sweat-room. So if you’re mindful about keeping yourself hydrated, you can continue using sauna safely.

What is your favorite benefit of sauna, share below in comments?

Source: Sauna Health Benefits and Dangers You Better Know About

Top 14 Tips To Get The Most Out Of Your Massage Session

Even if you are a new when it comes to massage, or you go for one on a weekly basis, there are a number of things you can do to make sure you get the most out of a massage and make your experience even more pleasurable.

Even if you are posses one of the luxury massage chairs at wellnessgeeky.com, you can still you this tips to get the most out of your session.

Tip 1

The most obvious thing to remember about going for a massage is not to have a large meal before your treatment as you may become uncomfortable during your session and then not be able to fully relax.

Tip 2

stay away from alcohol.

Tip 3

leave plenty of time to get to your appointments and try to arrive at least 15 minutes early. We all know how bad traffic can be! This will help you relax before the massage which in turn will make the masseuses job easier and makes your treatment more pleasurable.

Tip 4

if you are attending a spa or clinic where you can use the sauna or steam room prior to your session then make sure you do as it will loosen up your muscles. Do remember to take a shower prior to your visit to get rid of any soaps or chemicals from your skin.

Tip 5

find out before your appointment as to whether your massage will be done with you in the nude. If you are uncomfortable with this then make sure you wear appropriate undergarments that allow your massage to be done properly.

Tip 6

place your trust in your therapist and allow them to use their experience and professionalism to completely relax you.

Tip 7

do not be afraid to talk to your therapist. Discuss with them prior to the visit, any concerns you have, or any particular areas you think you need working on. During your visit if something is painful or not completely agreeable do not be afraid to speak up.

Tip 8

depending on the type of person you are, you may wish to chat during your session or you may wish to remain silent. As the client, it is up to you which you choose and most professional therapists will adapt to either situation depending on your lead.

Tip 9

try and keep breathing during your session! Even though this sounds daft, you will enjoy it all the more and be more relaxed if you concentrate on breathing properly.

Tip 10

try and remain as relaxed as possible during your massage. If you are tight due to being uncomfortable about something let your masseuse know and they will be out to help you out.

Tip 11

after the session is finished take a few minutes whilst still lying on the table to come back to reality. Sometimes you can get a little dizzy so never get off the table to quickly.

Tip 12

make sure you fully re-hydrate after your session and drink more water than you normally would. This will benefit you greatly and hydrate your muscles correctly.

Tip 13

try and allow some time after your session to relax otherwise you will not properly feel the benefits from your relaxing treatment. If you have to rush back to work or some other stressful part of your life, your body will not feel the full results.

Tip 14

do not think that one massage treatment is enough as the more often you go, the more relaxed you become. The first time may feel a little painful, but if you go regularly enough then you will reap the full rewards and become more relaxed over time.

Source Here: Top 14 Tips To Get The Most Out Of Your Massage Session

Improving Metabolism With Intermittent Fasting

Chances are that if you read this blog, you live in a developed country. Food is readily available.

Look around you. There is plenty of food. Plenty is not the right word. We love food. We swim in food. We adore food so much we have large, humongous signs outside. We have *temples* dedicated to food on every block. Our love life is around food. We give food to others to show how much we care. Or we deprive kids of food to punish them. We bestow moral values to food and our whole belief system is centered on the idea that food, or more food, is always good.

Well I have an opinion that most of us, or pretty much, the majority of us will find not like, or at least not understand. I think alternating periods of fasting and regular eating can actually be good for you. Fasting here means not eating anything solid for one or two days, making sure to drink plenty, and then going back to your regular diet (preferably Mediterranean diet) for at least a couple of months before fasting again.

So why would I want to starve myself?

I believe first that the abundance of food is actually killing us little by little. Most of the food we buy are super-charged with calories. All of them are fortified with extra-calcium, extra-iron, extra-this and that. When you get anything at a coffee shop, chances are you just won’t get black coffee. What about pumpkin flavor? A little bit of cream on top? And soya milk? And why not a bit of honey and cinnamon? And why not some matcha. And a muffin to go with all these. With blueberries.

These all sound good. Sure, we’ve all read somewhere about the beneficial effects of soya, cinnamon or blueberries. Except we’re stuffing a dustbin that’s already full. Soon the dustbin is overflowing and going to crack open. The dustbin is your liver – and many other organs we’re abusing in the process.

The idea of fasting is giving a rest to these ballooning dustbins we have inside of us and if we are lucky, cleaning them up. It’s in essence, getting rid of the excesses society has been giving us for decades.

Our ancestors never had this problem. They didn’t have a fridge or an elaborate industrial system. Food supply was a daily issue. In winter, or when times were rough, you would have starvation. On the other hand, when the hunters came back home, or when the “gods” were good, you would have plenty of food. Alternating between periods of fasting and plentiful food was the natural cycle, and perhaps prevented metabolic diseases such as obesity or diabetes to progress in prehistoric societies.

Back to 2017, there are three ways to do this:

Caloric restriction diet (CRD) means eating 10 to 15% less than your daily caloric needs. You still get all your vitamins and macro nutrients, but less of everything. This can be a long-term diet, however there are many drawbacks for exercise and physical performance. You will also need daily motivation, and the discipline of a monk with its life of restrictions.
Prolonged Fasting (PF) means fasting more than 5 days, up to 21 days, but still having all fluid intake. It’s usually done only once or twice a year, and is done in a special environment where you have assistance and ideally medical supervision. While interesting, it’s not practical for most of us.
Fasting-Mimicking Diet (FMD) also known as Intermittent Fasting is alternating days of fasting with a regular diet, with food, ad libitum. You skip food for a day or two, then follow a regular diet for a couple of months, before fasting again.

FMD is the most practical. You can work, go on with your lives. You might have a grumbling stomach but still have energy to run, jump, go to events and meetings. That’s what I did recently.

So … does it work? I lost a few pounds, feel more present, and less bloated. If you want evidence, recent research on FMD is more interesting though than someone’s personal anecdote ??

In a randomized clinical trial with subjects fasting for 5 days every month, subjects saw fasting blood glucose fell by 11%, human growth hormone by 24%, a 3% reduction in body weight, lower oxidative stress and substantial signs that the bodies were regenerating. This means the subjects saw their risk of cardiovascular disease or diabetes decrease and signs of slowed ageing.

It is very important to note that in this study, like all others, all subjects followed a regular maintenance diet, without restriction between periods of fasting.

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Another randomized clinical trial was done on patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), an autoimmune disease. Those who followed a Fasting-Mimicking Diet saw their symptoms alleviated. Researchers found FMD to be safe, feasible and potentially effective for MS patients.

Another study on 2122 women demonstrated that fasting improved glucose control and could decrease breast cancer risk. Another study on obese objects demonstrated similar effects, as well insulin decrease by 57% (more than half!)

Apart from hunger, and non-adherence to prescribed diet (meaning a few subjects couldn’t stand fasting and stopped following the experiment), the researchers did not notice any adverse effects in these 4 studies.

Unfortunately there are no large scale studies. All studies done on yeast, mice, monkeys and the little done on humans all point out that fasting have protective effects against age-related diseases. See a summary here.

What’s more, they also observed fasting slowed down ageing and encouraged regenerative processes. How come? A few researchers suggest that during fasting, the self-cannibalistic process of autophagy is encouraged, cleans up the bad cells and protects us against infections, cancer, cardiovascular disease, aging and disease. Whereas, during periods of eating ad libitum, damaged cells accumulate, along with DNA mutations, and tissues degenerates. This is what you see in the graph below (left being fasting):

As you can guess, the research is new. It’s not very popular. Most of us want to believe that it’s by eating an exotic super food that will get us cured or get extra energy. It is not logical to think that an ABSENCE of food might be actually good for us.

In this case, all signs and smoke point out that Less is definitively More.

If you are curious – I recommend skipping dinner next time. If you don’t observe any adverse effects, try fasting for one full day the next weekend. Make sure to eat without restriction after fasting. If it is still good, the go for the full weekend. Skipping food for a day or two won’t hurt you. Actually, the vast majority of recent medical research point out it might actually be good for you. Even if you are training or perform, fasting + exercise can have combined beneficial effects.

Improving Metabolism With Intermittent Fasting